lunes, 25 de enero de 2021

GERDA TARO´S LEFT HAND LEANING ON AN OAK TREE BETWEEN LOS LLANOS DEL CONDE AND EL RONQUILLO BAJO, APPROXIMATELY 2 KM IN THE NORTHEAST OF CERRO MURIANO (CÓRDOBA)

 By José Manuel Serrano Esparza 

SPANISH

                                                                                                       Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 

elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com has been able to discover Gerda Taro´s left hand in a picture made by Robert Capa on September 5, 1936 of three refugees from Cerro Muriano (an old woman wearing an apron and black coif covering her head, a roughly sixteen years old boy clad in dark trousers, white shirt, clear jacket and typical Andalusian straw hat and his sister, an approximately four years old little girl, who is being grabbed by him with his right hand) fleeing walking from Cerro Muriano village and are in the area between Los Llanos del Conde and El Ronquillo Bajo, advancing beside the Córdoba-Almorchón railway (out of image, around five meters behind the photographer) across the old way to the Obejo Train Station and El Vacar, places where they are marching to. 

Map including the area between Los Llanos del Conde and El Ronquillo Bajo (both of them belonging to the municipal district of Obejo) in which Robert Capa made on September 5, 1936 this photograph in which appears Gerda Taro´s left hand resting on an oak tree, while three refugees from Cerro Muriano walk at very few meters from the tracks of the Córdoba-Almorchón railway, bounded for the Old Obejo Train Station and El Vacar.

REASONS FOR THE APPEARANCE OF GERDA TARO´S LEFT HAND IN THE IMAGE

The hand visible on far left of the image is a delicate hand featuring long and thin fingers and corresponds to a 26 years old woman : Gerda Taro, who is standing, staring at Capa and seeing how the Hungarian photojournalist from Jewish descend is getting the picture, while the old woman and the approximately sixteen years old keep on their march looking forward, focused on saving themselves as soon as possible because they have had to quickly escape from Cerro Muriano because of the bombing of the village by the Francoist aviation, are afraid of being reached by the Moroccan trooops and their priority is to arrive as fast as feasible at the Old Obejo Train Station and El Vacar.

Obviously, the presence of Gerda Taro´s left hand on far left of the image is something happening by chance and not intentional by Capa at the moment in which he makes the photograph.

And it stems from some simultaneously converging key factors : 

A) Gerda Taro has steadily been next to Capa when he gets pictures since August 1936, when both of them arrived in Spain, because the German photojournalist from Jewish descend is beginning her photographic career and Capa has already worked as a professional photographer for four years, since he made the reportage of Leon Trotsky´s Speech at the Sports Palace of Copenhaguen (Denmark) on November 27, 1932.

A very intelligent and intuitive woman, in addition to being Capa´s girlfriend at the moment, Gerda Taro is utterly aware of his huge flair as a photographer and that´s why Capa makes most of the pictures during 1936 (she will become an independent photographer in 1937, significantly increasing her production), while she accompanies him mainly working as a commercial agent and representative of the images created by Capa, a highly enhanced scope thanks to her great friendship with Maria Eisner (director of Alliance Photo Agency in Paris, the most important one in Europe at the time along with Dephot Berlin, was director was Simon Guttmann), of whom she had been assistant since October 1935, with a monthly salary of 1,200 francs.

Gerda Taro has been getting pictures in Spain since mid August 1936 with a 6 x 6 cm medium format Reflex Korelle camera (discovery made by Irme Schaber and verified by elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com) until a few days bafore September 5, 1936, but evidence clearly suggest that either she ran out of 120 film rolls or the very thin and fragile metallic cable  located under the top panel of the camera, and on which depended both the shutter cocking and the film advance, broke (something often happening), so she didn´t make any pictures in th area of Cerro Muriano and between Cerro Muriano, the Old Obejo Train Station and El Vacar.

Therefore, that September 5, 1936, Gerda Taro was with Capa at every moment, watching from a very short distance how he made the photographs, because on boasting much more experienced than her, it was apparent that she he could learn very much from him.

Even five months later, in February 1937, when Gerda Taro had started to simultaneously use a 6 x 6 cm format Reflex Korelle camera (whose 120 film rolls made possible to get 12 shots and with which she got pictures in Almería of refugees coming from Málaga, sailors on board of the jaime I battleship and Republican soldiers) with a Leica II Model D turned into a Leica III (able to get 36 frames) with which she got a lot of pictures in the Ciudad Universitaria and Parque del Oeste zones in Madrid, Taro accidentally appears on the right of an image in which Capa photographs a non-commissioned officer of the International Brigades with a rifle, military cap and campaign boots walking down a stairs in the Ciudad Universitaria area of Madrid, pretending to be absent-minded, but really paying attention to the way in which Capa gets the picture.

And something similar took place on September 5, 1936 in this photograph made by Capa between Los Llanos del Conde and El Ronquillo Bajo, roughly 2 km in the northeast from Cerro Muriano.

Gerda Taro has been standing for some seconds before Capa gets the picture, with her left hand leaned on the oak tree and waiting for the arrival of the three refugees walking towards both of them.

In spite of the stifling heat (with a temperature of 40º C), Taro is wearing a long-sleeved black jacket, striving upon going as much unnoticed as possible but looking at Capa at the same time to see how he gets te picture including the old woman, the around sixteen years old boy and the approximately 4 years old little girl who are about to reach the proximity of the point where Capa is standing with his camera.

B) Gerda Taro has done her best not to appear in the photograph, above all trying to avoid deviating the attention of the three refugees, being standing, still, with her left hand on the oak tree and very near the spot through which the three people are advancing towards them, struggling to attain that if she is seen by the three refugees, the deviation degree of their looks be the minimum feasible, knowing that Capa always has a go at surprising the human beings he photographs. 

Capa is standing, at a distance of approximately 6 meters, perpendicularly with respect to the spot through which the three refugees from Cerro Muriano are going to pass.

He can´t approach as much as true to form he would like, since composively and at great speed, he decides to get inside the frame the high telegraph pole (including its higher area and the wires) for it to dominate the middle area of the image and separate the old woman from the young boy with his little sister trudging behind her.

Capa has got all five senses on getting a dynamic picture conveying a sense of movement, so he presses the shutter release button of his Leica II (Model D) rangefinder camera coupled to a Leitz Elmar 50 mm f/3.5 lens with his impressive timing accuracy, capturing the old woman´s left foot and the boy´s left leg and foot in full motion, providing the image with a remarkable feeling of mobility.

Moreover, Capa, always paying heed to even the smallest details making a difference, realizes that the old woman is walking faster and more powerfully than the young boy and his very little sister advancing behind her, because the roughly sixteen years old boy has to plod matching his walking with his sister´s one, so the image features much more dramatism than could seem at first blush, since the boy is constantly going ahead suffering the stress of having to be able to follow the steps of the old woman leading the group (probably his grandmother) and at the same time not to force the march of his very little sister to avoid her physical exhaustion, because there are still 10,5 km of very hard trek under a scorching sun until arriving at El Vacar.

C) It´s a highly instinctive and fast shot, made with the camera probably set at f/11 (hence the great depth of field in the image) and a relatively slow shutter speed (Capa used Eastman Kodak Nitrate Panchromatic black and white film featuring a sensitivity of Weston 32, equivalent to ISO 40) making that the left hand of the old woman (walking at a higher speed than the boy and his very small sister) appears blurry and oozing motion feeling.

Therefore, Capa´s great concentration on the three refugees from Cerro Muriano walking towards the left of the image and the quickness with which he shoots his camera, result in his unawereness about the presence of Gerda Taro´s hand on far left of the frame.

On the other hand,

the selective reframing of the image right area including the approximately sixteen years old boy and his roughly four years old little sister, makes possible to bear out the amazing timing precision and ability to perceive even the most minute details displayed by Capa, who has managed to capture the boy´s left foot in motion and with its heel on the ground, in stark contrast to the little girl´s left foot, also moving and whose forward area is the one touching the ground.

And an even larger selective reframing enables to verify something already visible in the complete image : unlike the old woman and the boy (who have been captured unaware of the photographer´s presence), the little girl has turned her face and is looking at Capa. 

CORNELL CAPA AND EDITH SCHWARTZ : A FUNDAMENTAL LABOUR IN THE PRESERVATION OF ROBERT CAPA´S PHOTOGRAPHIC LEGACY 

After the foundation of the International Center of Photography in New York in 1974 by Cornell Capa (Robert Capa´s brother),

                                                        Cornell Capa inside the ICP of New York in 1990. © Claire Yaffa

both he 

Cornell Capa and his wife Edith Schwartz in 2001, a few months before the demise of the latter on November 23, 2001. The picture was made by Capa on September 5, 1936 and shown in this article was a 18 x 24 cm copy on photographic paper donated by both of them to the ICP of New York in 1992. © Claire Yaffa

and his wife Edith Schwartz devoted their lives to the safeguarding of the photographic trove of images made by Robert Capa, who had died in Thai Binh (Vietnam) twenty years before, on May 25, 1954, when stepping on a mine, and also to the enhancing of photography, both in its photojournalist and artistic sphere, as well as passionately promoting the birth of a comprehensive range of photographic courses and lectures that turned the ICP in the reference-class benchmark in its field, something that has continued hitherto. 

And among the myriad of photographs related to Robert Capa and kept by the ICP of New York there were two prints that were always given great significance by Cornell Capa until his death on May 23, 2008 : two images created by Fred Stein (a top-notch German photographer, great friend of Capa, Chim, Gerda Taro and Csiki Weisz), who captured Gerda Taro with a typewriter in Paris in early 1936.

In the same way as happened in August of 2010 when elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com could discover both Gerda Taro´s head on far left of a picture made by Capa during the Harangue in the Finca of Villa Alicia and the location in it, those two photographs have also been very important now to do a comparative analysis of the images and be able to discern that the hand appearing on far left of the picture made by Capa on September 5, 1936 between Los Llanos del Conde and El Ronquillo Bajo, approximately 2 km in the northeast from Cerro Muriano and shown in this humble article, is Gerda Taro´s one. 



                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                    © Fred Stein


                                      Selective framing in which can be seen Gerda Taro´s delicate hands with long and thin fingers.

                                                                                                                                         © Fred Stein

Selective reframing of the second picture made by Fred Stein to Gerda Taro with her typewriter in Paris in early 1936, in which in spite of being slightly out of focus, it can be also appreciated Gerda Taro´s delicate left hand featuring long and thin fingers. 

And the comparison of 

the selective reframing of the picture made by Capa on September 5, 1936 between Los Llanos del Conde and El Ronquillo Bajo 

with the enlargement of a specific area of a photograph made by Walter Reuter in Valencia on July 4, 1937 to Gerda Taro holding a Leica III with Leitz Summar 5 cm f/2 lens, verifies even more that the hand appearing on far left of the aforementioned picture made by Capa on September 5, 1936 is Gerda Taro´s one.  

sábado, 23 de enero de 2021

MANO IZQUIERDA DE GERDA TARO APOYADA EN UNA ENCINA ENTRE LOS LLANOS DEL CONDE Y EL RONQUILLO BAJO, APROXIMADAMENTE 2 KM AL NOROESTE DE CERRO MURIANO (CÓRDOBA) EL 5 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 1936

 Por José Manuel Serrano Esparza

ENGLISH

                                                                                                       Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 

elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com ha podido descubrir la mano izquierda de Gerda Taro en una fotografía hecha por Robert Capa el 5 de Septiembre de 1936 a tres refugiados de Cerro Muriano (una anciana con delantal y cofia negra que cubre su cabeza, un muchacho de unos dieciséis años ataviado con pantalón oscuro, camisa blanca, chaqueta clara y típico sombrero de paja andaluz y su hermana, una niña muy pequeña, de unos cuatro años de edad, a la que lleva agarrada con su mano derecha) que huyen a pie del pueblo de Cerro Muriano y se hallan en la zona entre Los Llanos del Conde y El Ronquillo Bajo, avanzando junto a la vía férrea Córdoba-Almorchón (fuera de imagen, unos 5 metros detrás del fotógrafo) a través del antiguo camino hacia la Estación de Tren de Obejo y El Vacar, enclaves hacia los que se dirigen. 

Mapa en el que se aprecia la zona entre los Llanos del Conde y El Ronquillo Bajo (ambos pertenecientes al término municipal de Obejo) en la que Robert Capa hizo el 5 de septiembre de 1936 esta foto en la que aparece la mano izquierda de Gerda Taro apoyada en una encina, mientras tres refugiados de Cerro Muriano caminan a pié a muy pocos metros de las vías de la línea férrea Córdoba-Almorchón con rumbo hacia la Antigua Estación de Tren de Obejo y El Vacar.  

RAZONES PARA LA APARICIÓN DE LA MANO IZQUIERDA DE GERDA TARO EN LA IMAGEN

La mano que aparece a la izquierda del todo de la imagen está muy cuidada, posee unos dedos largos y delgados y corresponde a una mujer de 26 años : Gerda Taro, que está de pie, girada hacia Capa y viendo como el fotoperiodista húngaro de origen judío hace la foto, mientras la anciana y el muchacho de unos dieciséis años prosiguen su marcha mirando hacia adelante, concentrados en salvarse cuanto antes, ya que han tenido que huir precipitadamente de Cerro Muriano ante el bombardeo por parte de la aviación franquista, temen ser alcanzados por las tropas marroquís y su prioridad es llegar cuanto antes a la Antigua Estación de Tren de Obejo y El Vacar.

Obviamente, la aparición de la mano izquierda de Gerda Taro a la izquierda del todo de la fotografía es algo fortuito y no intencionado por parte de Capa en el momento en que capta la imagen.

                                                                          Y ello obedece a varios factores fundamentales que confluyen a la vez : 

A) Desde Agosto de 1936 en que ambos llegan a España, Gerda Taro está constantemente cerca de Capa cuando éste hace fotos, puesto que la fotoperiodista alemana de origen judío está empezando y Capa lleva ya cuatro años como fotógrafo profesional desde que hiciera el reportaje del discurso de León Trotsky en el Palacio de los Deportes de Copenhague (Dinamarca) el 27 de noviembre de 1932. 

Gerda Taro, mujer de gran inteligencia e intuición, además de pareja sentimental de Capa, es plenamente consciente del enorme talento de éste como fotógrafo y por ello, deja casi siempre durante 1936 (se independizará profesionalmente en 1937) que sea el fotoperiodista húngaro quien haga la inmensa mayoría de las fotos, mientras que ella le acompaña funcionando más  bien como agente comercial y representante de las imágenes realizadas por Capa, ámbito muy cimentado gracias a su gran amistad con Maria Eisner (directora de la agencia Alliance Photo en París, la más importante de Europa en esos momentos junto con Dephot Berlin, cuyo director era Simon Guttmann), de la que llevaba siendo asistente desde octubre de 1935, con un sueldo mensual de 1200 francos. 

Taro ha estado haciendo fotos en España desde mediados de agosto de 1936 con una cámara Réflex Korelle de formato medio 6 x 6 cm (descubrimiento realizado por Irme Schaber y verificado por elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com) hasta pocos días antes del 5 de septiembre de 1936, pero los indicios apuntan claramente a que o bien se quedó sin rollos de película de 120 o se rompió (algo que ocurría con bastante frecuencia en esta cámara) el muy delgado y frágil cable de metal que va por debajo del panel superior de la cámara y del que dependían tanto el armado del obturador como el avance de película, por lo que el 5 de septiembre de 1936 no hizo fotos ni en la zona de Cerro Muriano ni entre Cerro Muriano, la antigua Estación de Tren de Obejo y El Vacar. 

Por ello, dicho 5 de septiembre de 1936, Gerda Taro estuvo en todo momento acompañando a Capa, y observando desde muy cerca cómo hacía las fotos, porque sabía que podía aprender mucho de él, que en esos momentos tenía más experiencia.

Incluso cinco meses después, en Febrero de 1937, cuando Gerda Taro había empezado a simultanear el uso de la Reflex Korelle de formato medio 6 x 6 cm (cuyos rollos de película 120 permitían hacer sólo 12 fotografías y con las que capta imágenes en Almería de refugiados procedentes de Málaga, de marineros a bordo del acorazado Jaime I y de soldados republicanos) con una Leica II (Model D) reconvertida a Leica III (capaz de exponer 36 fotogramas) y con la que la fotoperiodista alemana hace fotografías en la zona de la Ciudad Universitaria y el Parque del Oeste de Madrid, Taro aparece accidentalmente a la derecha de una imagen en la que Capa fotografía a un suboficial de las Brigadas Internacionales con fusil, gorra militar y botas de campaña bajando unas escaleras en la zona de trincheras de la Ciudad Universitaria de Madrid, aparentemente distraída, pero en realidad atenta a como Capa hace la foto.


Y algo parecido ocurrió el 5 de septiembre de 1936 en esta foto hecha por Capa entre Los Llanos del Conde y El Ronquillo Bajo, aproximadamente 2 km al noroeste de Cerro Muriano.

Gerda Taro, está desde varios segundos antes de que Capa haga la foto, de pie, con la mano izquierda apoyada en la encina y esperando la llegada de los tres refugiados que caminan hacia ellos. 

Pese al enorme calor (unos 40º C de temperatura), Taro lleva puesta una chaqueta negra de manga larga, intentando pasar lo más desapercibida posible pero a la vez mirando a Capa para ver como hace la foto a la anciana, al chico joven de unos dieciséis años y a la niña pequeña de aproximadamente cuatro años que están a punto de llegar a la altura de Capa.

B) Gerda Taro ha hecho todo lo posible para no aparecer en la foto, sobre todo para no desviar la atención de los tres refugiados, de pie, quieta, con su mano izquierda sobre la encina y muy cerca del lugar por el que tienen que pasar las tres personas que avanzan caminando hacia ellos, intentando que si la ven el grado de desviación de sus miradas sea el mínimo posible, conocedora de que Capa siempre intenta sorprender a las personas a las que fotografía. 


Capa se ha situado a unos 6 metros de distancia, en perpendicular, con respecto al punto por el que pasarán los tres refugiados de Cerro Muriano.

No puede acercarse tanto como querría y es costumbre en él, ya que compositivamente y a gran velocidad, decide meter en el encuadre el alto poste de telégrafos (incluyendo su zona superior y los cables) para que domine la zona central de la imagen y que separe a la anciana y el chico joven con su hermana pequeña que avanzan tras ella. 

Capa tiene los cinco sentidos puestos en hacer una foto con el mayor dinamismo posible, y aprieta el botón disparador de su Leica II (Model D) telemétrica acoplada a un objetivo Leitz Elmar 50 mm f/3.5 con su impresionante precisión en el timing, captando el pie izquierdo de la anciana y la pierna y pie izquierdos del muchacho en pleno movimiento, confiriendo a la imagen una notable motricidad. 

Asimismo, Capa, siempre atento incluso a los más pequeños detalles que marcan la diferencia, percibe que la anciana camina con mayor velocidad y potencia que el chico joven y su hermana muy pequeña que avanzan tras ella, ya que el chico de unos dieciséis años tiene que ir al ritmo de la niña, por lo que la imagen posee mucho más dramatism del que pudiera parecer en un principio, ya que el muchacho está en todo momento con el stress de poder seguir de cerca a la anciana (probablemente su abuela) y a la vez no forzar la marcha de su hermana muy pequeña para evitar su agotamiento, ya que les faltan todavía unos 10,5 km de caminata a pleno sol para llegar hasta El Vacar. 

C) Es un tiro muy instintivo y rápido, con la cámara probablemente configurada a f/11 (de ahí la gran profundidad de campo de la imagen) y una velocidad de obturación relativamente lenta (Capa utilizó película de blanco y negro Eastman Kodak Panchromatic con sensibilidad Weston 32, equivalente a ISO 40) que hace que la mano izquierda de la anciana (que camina a mayor velocidad que el chico y su hermana pequeña) aparezca trémula y con sensación de movimiento.

Así pues, la enorme concentración de Capa en los tres refugiados de Cerro Muriano que caminan hacia la izquierda de la imagen y la velocidad con la que dispara su cámara, hacen que no se dé cuenta de la presencia de la mano de Gerda Taro a la izquierda del todo de la imagen.

Por otra parte, 

el reencuadre selectivo de la zona derecha de la imagen incluyendo el chico joven de unos dieciséis años y a su hermana pequeña de aproximadamente cuatro, permite corroborar la increíble precisión en el timing y capacidad de percepción de los más pequeños detalles por parte de Capa, que ha conseguido plasmar el pie izquierdo del muchacho en movimiento y con el talón apoyado sobre el terreno, en contraste con el pie izquierdo de la niña, también en movimiento y cuya zona delantera es la que está tocando el suelo. 


Y el reencuadre selectivo aún mayor permite verificar algo ya visible en la imagen completa : a diferencia de la anciana y el muchacho (que han sido captados por sorpresa, sin que detecten la presencia del fotógrafo), la niña pequeña ha girado la cabeza y está mirando a Capa. 

CORNELL CAPA Y EDITH SCHWARTZ, UNA LABOR FUNDAMENTAL EN LA PRESERVACIÓN DEL LEGADO FOTOGRÁFICO DE ROBERT CAPA 

Tras la fundación del International Center of Photography de Nueva York en 1974 por Cornell Capa (hermano de Robert Capa), 

                                                                     Cornell Capa en el interior del ICP de Nueva York en 1990© Claire Yaffa


tanto él 

Cornell Capa y su esposa Edith Schwartz en 2001, pocos meses antes del fallecimiento de esta última el 23 de noviembre de 2001. La fotografía hecha por Capa el 5 de septiembre de 1936 y objeto de este artículo fue una copia sobre papel fotográfico tamaño 18 x 24 cm donada por ambos al ICP de Nueva York en 1992. © Claire Yaffa                           

como su mujer Edith Schwartz dedicaron sus vidas a la preservación del legado fotográfico de Robert Capa, que había muerto en Thai Binh (Vietnam) 20 años antes, el 25 de Mayo de 1954, al pisar una mina, y también a la potenciación de la fotografía tanto en su vertiente fotoperiodística como artística, además de promocionar con pasión la génesis de una amplia gama de cursos fotográficos y conferencias que convirtieron al ICP en el referente mundial en su ámbito, algo que continúa plenamente vigente hoy en día. 

Y entre la pléyade de fotografías vinculadas a Robert Capa y preservadas por el ICP hubo dos copias en papel fotográfico a las que Cornell Capa siempre dió gran importancia hasta su muerte el 23 de mayo de 2008: dos imágenes creadas por Fred Stein (gran fotógrafo alemán muy amigo de Capa, Chim, Gerda Taro y Csiki Weisz), que captó a Gerda Taro con una máquina de escribir en París a principios de 1936. 

Al igual que ocurrió en agosto de 2010, cuando elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com pudo descubrir tanto la cabeza de Gerda Taro a la izquierda del todo de una fotografía hecha por Capa durante la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, como la ubicación en ella, las dos mismas fotos de Gerda Taro hechas por Fred Stein y que fueron importantes entonces para poder realizar dichos hallazgos, han sido también ahora fundamentales para poder hacer un análisis comparativo de imágenes y poder discernir que la mano que aparece a la izquierda del todo en la foto hecha por Capa el 5 de septiembre de 1936 entre Los Llanos del Conde y El Ronquillo Bajo, aproximadamente 2 km al noroeste de Cerro Muriano y objeto de este modesto artículo, es la de Gerda Taro. 







                                                                                                                                © Fred Stein


Reencuadre selectivo en el que se puede apreciar las manos muy cuidadas con dedos largos y delgados de Gerda Taro. 


                                                                                                                                         © Fred Stein



Reencuadre selectivo de la segunda fotografía hecha por Fred Stein a Gerda Taro con su máquina de escribir en París a principios de 1936, en la que pese a estar ligeramente desenfocada, puede apreciarse también la mano izquierda muy cuidada, con dedos alargados y delgados, de Gerda Taro. 

Y el análisis comparativo del 


reencuadre selectivo de la foto hecha por Capa el 5 de septiembre de 1936 entre Los Llanos del Conde y El Ronquillo Bajo 

                                                                                                                      
con la ampliación de la zona específica de una fotografía hecha por Walter Reuter en Valencia el 4 de Julio de 1937 a Gerda Taro con una Leica III con objetivo Leitz Summar 5 cm f/2, verifica todavía más si cabe que la mano izquierda que aparece a la izquierda del todo de la fotografía mencionada anteriormente, hecha por capa el 5 de Septiembre de 1936, es la de Gerda Taro.

martes, 5 de enero de 2021

FINCA DE VILLA ALICIA : DESCUBIERTA LA UBICACIÓN DE CUATRO FOTOGRAFÍAS MÁS HECHAS POR ROBERT CAPA EL 5 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 1936. CERRO MURIANO SE CONSOLIDA TODAVÍA MÁS SI CABE COMO LA CUNA DEL MODERNO FOTOPERIODISMO DE GUERRA

 José Manuel Serrano Esparza

elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com ha podido descubrir la ubicación de cuatro fotografías más hechas por Robert Capa el 5 de Septiembre de 1936 en la Finca de Villa Alicia y que pertenecen a la serie " Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia ", de la que venimos informando desde 2010.

                                                                                                           Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York



            Photo : Robert Capa/ ©  ICP New York 


                                                                                                          Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 


                                                                                                       Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York  

Estas cuatro imágenes aparecen en el libro " Death in the Making " de 1938, editado por Covici Friede Publishers New York, del que hace pocos meses pudimos conseguir un original de dicho año en muy buen estado de conservación.

Pero lo que no se sabía era la ubicación de las mismas, que hemos podido localizar en la Finca de Villa Alicia (Cerro Muriano) durante la mencionada Arenga en la que Enrique Vañó Nicomedes (Secretario General de la CNT de Alcoy) y Felipe Colomé (también miembro de la CNT de Alcoy) pronuncian subidos en un tonel aproximadamente a las 12:30 h del mediodía del 5 de septiembre de 1936 (media hora antes del ataque de las feroces tropas marroquís de tabor de regulares de Sáenz de Buruaga) sendas alocuciones tratando de insuflar ánimo a milicianos anarquistas de la CNT y la FAI de Alcoy así como a milicianos andaluces que escuchan atentamente sus palabras antes del combate, en medio de sentimientos de angustia, honda preocupación, temor a perder la vida, introspección pensando en sus seres queridos durante los momentos previos a la batalla, etc.

Instantes que son magistralmente captados por Capa utilizando una Leica II (Model D) telemétrica formato 24 x 36 mm acoplada a un objetivo Leitz Elmar 50 mm f/3.5, desde una distancia increíblemente próxima y consiguiendo pasar desapercibido, máxima aspiración de todo buen fotoperiodista durante el acto fotográfico.

IMÁGENES TRASCENDENTALES 

Estas cuatro fotografías son muy relevantes porque muestran una vez más la inefable pasión por la fotografía, increíble velocidad de movimientos, gran habilidad para volverse invisible durante el acto fotográfico y descomunal talento para conseguir la foto en Robert Capa, un fotógrafo que nunca se creyó el mejor y que siempre consideró que otros miembros de la Agencia Magnum a los que admiró profundamente como el genio Werner Bischof, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David Seymour " Chim " , etc,  eran muy superiores a él desde un punto de vista técnico. 

La fotografía de Capa es todo instinto, lucha hasta la extenuación por conseguir la foto, con insólita capacidad para acercarse todo lo posible a las personas fotografiadas y un gran don natural para la captación de momentos decisivos, todo ello aderezado por una extraordinaria sensibilidad y talento para transmitir emociones y mensajes con sus imágenes.


                                                                                                     Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Foto 1

Dos milicianos de la CNT y la FAI de Alcoy miran y escuchan al jefe anarquista (fuera de imagen) que subido en un tonel les arenga para darles ánimos antes del inminente combate contra las temidas tropas marroquís de tabor de regulares de la tercera columna atacante franquista al mando del coronel Sáenz de Buruaga. 

Su expresión facial lo dice todo : ambos están con la boca entreabierta, jadeantes y sudorosos. 

El miliciano de la izquierda, vestido con mono oscuro, tiene barba de varios días, mira al orador con un semblante a la vez duro y de máxima incertidumbre y apoya su espalda en el árbol tras él mientras sus manos descansan en sus caderas.

Por su parte, el miliciano de la derecha, ataviado con un mono blanco muy desgastado y las mangas subidas, mira y escucha con desolación al orador, mientras simultáneamente se halla en profunda introspección pensando en una muy probable muerte en combate frente a las feroces tropas marroquís.

Este hombre experimenta una fase inicial de shock anímico, agarra a la vez nerviosamente tanto el cañón de su fusil Máuser calibre 7 x 57 mm con el que se apoya sobre el suelo como la zona inferior de una pequeña manta que lleva sobre su hombro izquierdo, y su brazo derecho descansa sobre el árbol.  

                                                                                                               Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Capa hace un tiro muy meritorio, desde una distancia muy próxima, a unos dos metros de distancia de ambos milicianos y perpendicular a ellos.

Ha conseguido acercarse al máximo posible y aprieta el botón disparador de su Leica II (Model D) con objetivo Leitz Elmar 50 mm f/3.5 consiguiendo pasar totalmente desapercibido, sin que ninguno de los dos milicianos detecten su presencia, además de obtener un encuadre muy cerrado, típico en su estilo muy instintivo de fotografiar, con una gran rapidez de movimientos, un encomiable dominio de las distancias de enfoque, una constante atención hasta los más mínimos detalles, y un gran talento y precisión en el timing al apretar el botón liberador del obturador de su cámara para plasmar los instantes más significativos, disparando siempre a pulso.

Aproximadamente un cuarto de siglo antes de que los objetivos angulares de 35 mm se convirtieran en la óptica fotoperiodística por excelencia a partir de finales de los años cincuenta, Capa hace un uso magistral del objetivo standard Elmar 50 mm f/3.5 de 4 elementos en 3 grupos diseñado por Max Berek (que fue el referente fotoperiodístico entre la segunda mitad de los años veinte y finales de los años cincuenta junto con el Carl Zeiss Jena Sonnar 5 cm f/1.5 diseñado por Ludwig Bertele en 1932), sacando un gran partido de las notables cualidades como tele corto inherentes a los objetivos de 50 mm a la hora de obtener retratos y fotografías de medio cuerpo sin distorsión desde distancias muy próximas. 

Ni que decir tiene que mientras Capa hace las fotos de la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, percibe claramente un contexto por momentos macabramente surrealista en el que combatientes civiles procedentes de las profesiones más comunes van a enfrentarse a tropas muy profesionales del Ejército de África con abundante experiencia en combate y gran pericia en el manejo de las armas. 

Esta fotografía aparece también en la zona inferior izquierda de la página 727 de la revista inglesa London Illustrated News del 24 de Octubre de 1936, y jmse descubrió su ubicación en la Finca de Villa Alicia en Abril de 2011.

Pero la reproducción de esta imagen que aparece en el libro " Death in the Making " de 1938, editado por Covici Friede Publishers New York tiene muchísima más calidad que la de la mencionada revista inglesa, por lo que ha sido posible discernir muchos más detalles tanto de los rasgos faciales de los dos milicianos que aparecen en ella como de sus vestimentas y el paisaje circundantes, verificando aún más que la foto fue hecha por Capa en la Finca de Villa Alicia (Cerro Muriano) el 5 de septiembre de 1936.


                                                                                                           Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York  

Foto 2 : Imagen impresionante y enormemente dramática en la que Capa fotografía a un miliciano andaluz de unos 40 años de edad, con bigote y ataviado con una boina a cuadros.

Este hombre lleva varios minutos escuchando la arenga de los dos jefes de la CNT de Alcoy subidos en un tonel en la Finca de Villa Alicia (Cerro Muriano) y Capa le capta justo en el momento en que sudoroso, se derrumba emocionalmente, cierra los ojos y su cabeza cae hacia atrás, fruto de la desazón y el stress. 

Es un hombre más veterano que el resto de abundantes combatientes civiles, tanto de Alcoy (Alicante) como de Andalucía, presentes durante la arenga, por lo que su mayor edad y experiencia le hace comprender claramente la magnitud del peligro, porque van a tener que luchar a muerte contra las feroces tropas marroquís de tabor de regulares, que intentarán arrollarles para atacar la vertiente norte de la colina Torreárboles y coger entre dos fuegos a las tropas republicanas que defienden su cima y que desde aproximadamente las 10 de la mañana del 5 de septiembre de 1936 están siendo atacadas a través de la vertiente sur por la columna franquista de la izquierda al mando del comandante Sagrado. 


                                                                                                           Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 

La foto es técnicamente muy imperfecta : Está ligeramente desenfocada y muestra una enorme cantidad de grano, por lo que podría tratarse de un reencuadre selectivo realizado por un editor a partir de la fotografía en blanco y negro en la que había más milicianos, de tal manera que se ha producido una notable degradación de la calidad de imagen desde un punto de vista técnico.  

Pero ello no importa en absoluto en este tipo de imágenes fotoperiodísticas en las que los factores clave son estar en el lugar adecuado en el momento más idóneo, acercarse al máximo posible a la persona o personas fotografiadas y apretar el botón disparador de la cámara con la mayor precisión para captar los momentos más definitorios, algo que Capa ha conseguido plenamente con esta imagen, presidida por una potente diagonal izquierda que enmarca el hombro derecho y la cara del miliciano andaluz, cuyo rostro aparece muy convulso. 

Se percibe claramente un titánico esfuerzo por Capa para captar este momento decisivo, porque es una foto totalmente instintiva, hecha a gran velocidad y desde un ángulo bajo contrapicado para enfatizar el dramatismo, plasmando un instante atemporal que simboliza muy bien lo que es la guerra y los sentimientos que genera.

Muy probablemente, este hombre está pensando no sólo en el gran peligro que correrá su vida durante el inminente combate, sino también en sus seres más queridos a los que quizá no volverá a ver. 

Pero internamente hace acopio de todo el valor que puede y está dispuesto a luchar y morir si es preciso.

Esta extraordinaria fotografía es un gran ejemplo del arquetipo de imagen Leica fotoperiodística de los años treinta, cuarenta y cincuenta, en la que el enfoque no es perfecto al 100%, (un aspecto estudiado en profundidad por el experto suizo de talla mundial en Historia de la Fotografía Michael Auer y explicado en muchas de sus conferencias). 

Pero el dramatismo de esta imagen no termina aquí,

Capa lleva ya un buen rato observando y fotografiando a este miliciano campesino andaluz con boina a cuadros. 

                                                                                                              Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

¿Quién es este hombre?

Tras un concienzudo análisis de la imagen, hemos podido descubrir que se trata de la misma persona que aparece a la derecha de la primera fotografía que hace Capa durante la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, cuya ubicación en la misma y la presencia de Gerda Taro a la izquierda fueron descubiertas por José Manuel Serrano Esparza el 1 de Agosto de 2010 : 


                                                                                                           Photo: Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 
      
Página 727 de la revista inglesa Illustrated London News del 24 de Octubre de 1936 en cuya zona superior izquierda aparece el mismo miliciano campesino andaluz con boina a cuadros y escopeta de caza colgando de su hombro izquierdo. 

Y es también el mismo hombre que aparece en otra fotografía con una escopeta de caza colgando de su hombro izquierdo, mirando al orador y escuchando sus palabras durante la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, cuya ubicación también fue descubierta por José Manuel Serrano Esparza en Abril de 2011 : 


tanto en el área superior izquierda de la mitad superior de la página 727 de la revista Illustrated London News del 24 de Octubre de 1936 como en una de las páginas del libro The Spanish People´s Fight for Liberty compilado por A. Ramos Oliveira y publicado por el Departamento de Prensa de la Embajada Española en Londres en 1937, que utilizó el negativo original formato 24 x 36 mm revelado por Csiki Weisz (gran amigo y laboratorista de Capa en París) y enviado por Maria Eisner (Directora de la Agencia Alliance Photo en la capital francesa) : 

Imagen del campesino miliciano andaluz con boina a cuadros y escopeta de caza colgando de su hombro izquierdo que aparece reproducida en tamaño 19 x 24 cm en una de las páginas del libro The Spanish People´s Fight for Liberty de 1937 y que también aparece reproducida en tamaño 20 x 25 cm en una de las páginas del libro Death in the Making, editado por Covici Friede Publishers New York en 1938. La ubicación de esta fotografía en la Finca de Villa Alica fue descubierta por José Manuel Serrano Esparza en Abril de 2011. © Robert Capa / ICP New York  

Es decir, Capa consigue en gran medida fotografiar las sensaciones y reacciones de este miliciano campesino andaluz mientras escucha la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, en la que se les informa de que van a tener que enfrentarse a la bayoneta a las temidas tropas del Ejército de África. 

                                                                                                        Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Foto 3 : Capa fotografía a uno de los numerosos grupos de milicianos que están escuchando la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, desde una posición algo elevada. 

Una vez más, la escena que capta es desoladora. La mayoría de los milicianos a los que se aprecia en imagen pertenecen a la CNT y la FAI de Alcoy (Alicante), aunque también se aprecia al fondo de la misma, ligeramente desenfocado, a un miliciano andaluz con sombrero típico y a una mujer probablemente andaluza a la izquierda. 

La expresión facial de estos milicianos mientras escuchan la arenga refleja una enorme inquietud y preocupación : saben ya que van a tener que luchar por sus vidas ante las feroces tropas marroquís de tabor de regulares, que desde un punto de vista militar son en esos momentos junto con La Legión la mejor infantería de choque del mundo, por lo que no tienen prácticamente ninguna posibilidad de supervivencia. 

Pero Capa percibe también que a pesar de las circunstancias totalmente adversas, estos milicianos hacen acopio de todo el coraje que pueden y están dispuestos para el combate, algo que llama muy poderosamente su atención, al igual que ocurre con Gerda Taro (fuera de imagen), que está a pocos metros de él, mirando atónita lo que está ocurriendo mientras escucha también la arenga. 

                                                                                                             Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

La imagen está semánticamente dominada por el miliciano de Alcoy con mono y gorro oscuro sin borla, cuyo rostro desencajado y profunda introspección repleta de angustia sintetizan fielmente el crisol de emociones y sentimientos que genera la guerra. La potente diagonal hacia la derecha que describe su rostro (según se aprecia en la fotografía) realza aún más el dramatismo de la escena.

Por su parte, el miliciano con mono y gorro claros que aparece detrás de él, con barba de varios días, ligeramente desenfocado, tiene la boca abierta, está convulso, sudoroso, apretando los dientes y también pensando para sus adentros que puede morir en la lucha, mientras el miliciano que está a su derecha mira nerviosamente alrededor por si aparecen de repente las tropas marroquís. 

Durante toda la arenga, todos los milicianos alcoyanos y andaluces presentes, así como Capa y Gerda Taro, están escuchando el intercambio de disparos de fusil, artillería y mortero entre las tropas republicanas que defienden la cima de la colina Torreárboles y la columna franquista de la izquierda al mando del comandante Sagrado, que está atacando cuesta arriba la vertiente sur de dicha cota. 

                                                                                                                   Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Asimismo, Capa, siempre atento hasta a los más pequeños detalles que marcan la diferencia, dispara su cámara justo en el momento en el que el rostro de una mujer andaluza (situada a la izquierda de la imagen, delante del miliciano que fuma un cigarrillo intentando tranquilizarse) aparece parcialmente cubierto por el miliciano alcoyano de la CNT con gorro oscuro y borla situado delante de ella.

Esta imposibilidad de discernir los rasgos faciales de la mujer de unos 60 años de edad (quizá la madre de alguno de los milicianos andaluces que escuchan la arenga) confiere una enorme simbología dramática a la imagen, ya que se halla cabizbaja y pensativa, plenamente consciente del enorme riesgo para sus vidas que se avecina para todos estos hombres. 

A su vez, el semblante del mencionado miliciano alcoyano con gorro oscuro y borla a la izquierda de la fotografía refleja gran nerviosismo e incertidumbre. 

Saben que las tropas de élite del Ejército de África están a  pocos cientos de metros de distancia y que pueden atacarles en cualquier momento, algo que es plenamente corroborado por el miliciano a la derecha del todo de la imagen, captado por Capa de perfil, que no dirige su mirada al orador subido en el tonel (fuera de imagen), sino que, muy nervioso, mira fijamente en derredor, buscando con la vista a soldados marroquís. 

Por su parte, el joven miliciano con mono oscuro, gran manta blanca sobre su hombro izquierdo y una especie de boina oscura ancha sobre la cabeza aparece también con la boca abierta, jadeante y refleja en su cara notable inquietud. 

                                                                                                               Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York 

En la mitad inferior izquierda de la imagen, el miliciano de Alcoy que está justo delante del que lleva un gorro oscuro con borla aparece con el ceño fruncido y un semblante que refleja honda preocupación, realzada por las miradas perdidas tanto del jovencísimo miliciano de aproximadamente 17 años de edad y gorro claro que aparece en la esquina inferior derecha de la fotografía como del que aparece en la esquina inferior izquierda de la misma, ataviado con un gorro claro con borla. 

Aunque todas las personas visibles en imagen están escuchando tanto las palabras del orador mientras pronuncia la arenga como los disparos procedentes de la vertiente sur y cima de Torreárboles, un significativo porcentaje de ellos ha dejado ya de mirar a los jefes anarquistas que intentan darles ánimos subidos en el tonel. 

                                                                                                               Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York


Desde un punto de vista compositivo, Capa sitúa el epicentro de interés de la imagen en el triángulo formado por cinco milicianos : el situado más a la izquierda de la imagen, el miliciano con gorro oscuro con borla que está justo detrás de él, el miliciano con gorro oscuro sin borla, el miliciano con boina oscura y manta de gran tamaño sobre su hombro izquierdo y el jovencísimo miliciano de unos 17 años de edad cuya cabeza ocupa la esquina inferior derecha de la fotografía. 


                                                                                               Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York


Foto 4 : Capa fotografía a un miliciano andaluz ataviado con sombrero típico mientras escucha la Arenga en la Finca de Villa Alicia, aproximadamente a las 12:30 h del mediodía del 5 de septiembre de 1936.

El fotógrafo se acerca con enorme sigilo al miliciano andaluz, que lleva una manta sobre su hombro derecho y está fumando un cigarrillo intentando relajarse en medio de la muy especial atmósfera de tensión imperante en esos momentos, captándole sin ser detectado, con un ángulo ligeramente contrapicado, para enfatizar su expresión facial que revela stress y conmoción, mientras agarra nerviosamente con su mano derecha la zona delantera de su fusil Máuser, con el que se apoya en el suelo. 

Al igual que ocurre con la Foto 2, esta imagen reproducida en el libro Death in the Making de 1938 es probablemente un reencuadre selectivo realizado a partir de una zona concreta de la fotografía original en la que habría más milicianos, porque exhibe muchísimo grano y falta de detalle en la ropa y rostro del miliciano, aunque la gran acutancia de la película de blanco y negro Eastman Kodak Panchromatic Nitrate con sensibilidad Weston 32 (equivalente a aproximadamente ISO 40) utilizada por Capa en simbiosis con el revelador Agfa Rodinal optimizado para conseguir la máxima percepción visual de nitidez y usado por Csiki Weisz en París, han conseguido preservar el suficiente nivel de detalle como para poder apreciar la expresión facial de este combatiente.

La fuerte luz solar que ilumina la zona izquierda de la cara de este miliciano andaluz, dejando en sombra el área derecha de la misma, acentúa junto con la gran zona low key del interior del sombrero el dramatismo de la imagen, en la que una vez más, Capa capta magistralmente un momento muy significativo.

VERIFICACIÓN DE QUE ROBERT CAPA HIZO EN LA FINCA DE VILLA ALICIA (CERRO MURIANO) OTRA FOTOGRAFÍA MÁS DURANTE LA ARENGA

Fotografía hecha por Robert Capa en la Finca de Villa Alicia (Cerro Muriano) el 5 de septiembre de 1936 y que aparece en una de las páginas del libro Death in the Making de 1938 con mucha más calidad que en la página 727 de la revista inglesa The Illustrated London News del 24 de octubre de 1936. Foto : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York.

Además de las fotografías anteriores, el libro Death in the Making editado por Covici Friede Publishers New York en 1938 incluye otra imagen hecha por Capa, cuya ubicación en la Finca de Villa Alicia (Cerro Muriano) descubrimos en Abril de 2011. 


Es una fotografía que aparece en la zona inferior derecha de la página 727 de la revista Illustrated London News del 24 de octubre de 1936, pero también en el libro Death in the Making de 1938, con mucha más calidad de imagen :

                                                                                                Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Vemos a un miliciano anarquista con gorro de la CNT o de la FAI captado lateralmente, con un encuadre cuyo límite superior coincide con la zona más elevada del gorro del miliciano, mientras que el inferior está delimitado por aproximadamente la zona justo por encima del codo del brazo izquierdo y el área alta estomacal, y lleva sobre el pecho varios pequeños objetos de color claro y forma rectangular, atados con cuerdas.

Este miliciano anarquista de Alcoy (Alicante) aparece también en la fotografía mencionada anteriormente (página 71 del libro Capa: Cara a Cara Fotografías de Robert Capa sobre la Guerra Civil Española de la Colección del Museo Nacional de Arte Reina Sofía de Editorial Aperture, y en la página 85 del libro Robert Capa Obra Fotográfica de Editorial Phaidon escrito por Richard Whelan), en la zona central de su mitad derecha, en la que en 2010 descubrimos que todas las fotos de la Arenga habían sido hechas por Capa en la Finca de Villa Alicia, así como la cabeza de Gerda Taro a la izquierda : 

                                                                                                         Photo : Robert Capa / ©  ICP New York

Es el segundo hombre a la derecha del miliciano andaluz cuyo sombrero toca las letras blancas pintadas que se aprecian sobre la mitad superior de un coche mayormente tapado por los cuerpos de los muchos milicianos que están de pie escuchando la arenga del jefe miliciano anarquista que les está hablando desde una posición elevada, subido en un tonel.

Sin ningún género de dudas es la misma persona, idénticas facciones, idénticas patillas, el mismo corte de pelo, idéntico gorro de miliciano y exactamente el mismo pañuelo.